Sunday, December 10, 2017

12 Reasons Why You Should Be Thrift Shopping!


Long before thrift shopping was cool, I was doing it to stretch my budget and because I just couldn't afford new things. In fact, my parents did the same thing! I grew up on hand-me-downs until I outgrew my cousin's clothes. Almost all my books came from used bookstores and the library. We went to auctions and garage sales. My parents needed to stretch their pennies too!

Now thrift shopping is cool. Thrift stores are gaining popularity as are the "for sale" or "garage sale" groups on Facebook. Craigslist is still going strong and eBay is still a great place to unload your used but still in great condition goods. Consignment shops are still a good place to buy and unload your good condition goods (and make a little extra money!). Garage sales are still fun places to shop!

I have a lot of fun thrift shopping as long as I don't go overboard. I want you all to be thrift shoppers too. If you are, but know someone who should be, show them this post!

12 Reasons Why You Should Be Thrift Shopping!

1. Thrift shopping is sustainable. If you are even a little bit concerned about our planet, you know there are way too many goods being produced today. More than can be used actually, but people still demand and buy them. By buying used, you are breaking that cycle and keeping perfectly good things from going to the landfill. To keep the sustainability cycle going, you should use those used goods until they are completely worn out or pass them on to someone who can use it. 

2. You are a non-consumer. As stated in #1, you are breaking the consumerism cycle. When you purchase something used, you are a non-consumer. You are not buying something new. You are not supporting the mass merchandisers. You are not succumbing to advertising telling you need something new. You are using what someone doesn't need anymore and you are not supporting people who have no interest in your local economy.

3. Thrift shopping supports your local economy! Whether you buy something from a used goods store or a person, your money stays right in that area. Your money isn't going to some big corporation who cares very little about you. Your money is going to a local organization (except Goodwill) or people who will in turn spend that money locally. 

4. Why buy new when used will do? This phrase is attributed to a certain person, but honestly it has been around awhile. Why? Because it is true! Used is just as good as new in most situations. Most of my clothes and my kids' clothes were used growing up. We got new things for gifts at birthdays and holidays, but otherwise they were used. Even when they were in high school, we regularly found almost new and new clothes for them at the thrift store. I still buy almost all of my clothes used because you can't beat the prices!

5. You save money! Doesn't everyone like to save money? You can outfit an apartment or a house for hundreds of dollars cheaper than buying new. Does buying used things gross you out? Wash them once and get over it. You are saving money! 

6. If you have kids, you are teaching them frugality. My kids liked to go to the thrift stores and garage sales growing up. They still do even as teenagers and young adults. They also have found a lot of great things there. They learned one way of being frugal and they learned that used things were not gross. The younger they learn that, the better.

7. You will find brand new things while thrift shopping. Honestly, this is the best. People are often too lazy to return something to the store or cannot return it so they will just donate it to the thrift store or sell on a garage sale. Their loss is your gain because, most of the time, you will get it for only a few dollars. Score!

8. Anyone can thrift shop! And I do mean anyone. Some of the most financially stable people I know are avid used goods shoppers. They love a good deal and refuse to pay full price. Let's take some tips from those people, shall we? You can be a prepper, homesteader, parent, retiree, single, married, young, old, rich, poor, and anything else you can identify with. Anyone can be a thrift shopper!

9. You can find really good presents while thrift shopping. I have found a lot of presents while thrift shopping. Books that look brand new. Clothes with tags still on them. Sets of dishes still in the original sealed box. Candle sticks and vases because I know people that collect them. You get the hint. Start your gift shopping at the thrift store or online consignment sites and go from there. 

10. Once you start, you won't be able to stop. I know that sounds pompous, but it is true. The idea you will be saving money and scoring some really good stuff is addicting. When you realize you can do this all the time, you will be hooked!

11. The inventory is always changing. If you can't find what you are looking for one day, wait a few days and come back to the store/check again online. More than likely, you will find what you want at a price that is reasonable or cheap. 

12. Thrift stores have sales too. They get a lot of things donated or consigned to them. They often do not have the storage for these things so they run sales. Our local stores often run a buy 1 get 1 free or buy 2 get one free sales. They also have bag sales where a bag of goods is five dollars no matter what you have in the bag. I know other thrift stores will have 50% off sales and more. Keep your eyes open and you will find even better deals at the thrift stores. 

Thrift shopping is fun! The pursuit can be challenging at times, but the results are usually worth it. Just know, even with thrift shopping, you need to be mindful of your budget and not get crazy while shopping. Sometimes, people will buy whatever they want because it is a good deal, but they still overspend. 

What is your favorite thing to buy in the thrift store?

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Tuesday, December 5, 2017

9 Ways You Can Light Up Your Home When The Power Is Out


The power has gone out! Now what?

The power going out can be scary and discomforting especially if you have kids. You need to have some ways to light up whatever you are doing. You need to provide some light to give comfort and make the time go by faster. 

Some lights have better uses than other lights. Some lights will be just for lighting up the room enough to walk around in. Some lights will help you see what you are doing or reading. All these options will be great for camping or being outside after dark. Every light listed below will have a purpose and a place in your preps.

Here is the thing about having non-electric lights. You need to have a very good supply of batteries on hand at all times. Most of these options will probably take batteries.

9 Ways You Can Light Up Your Home When The Power Is Out

1. Flashlights. These are just handy to have all the time. You can buy some of the cheap ones and some expensive ones. We keep the cheap little ones in almost every room of our house including the bedrooms. You should always have a flashlight in a night table drawer or beside the bed.

You can buy different kinds of flashlights too. You can buy the battery powered ones and I recommend that. You can also buy hand-cranked and/or solar powered flashlights. I have a few of these and they can be useful, but they take a fair amount of cranking and their time of use is limited. However, they are rechargeable.

2. Headlamps. Headlamps are handy to have. They make working on anything in the dark a bit easier. If you are trying to read or sew in the dark, they work well for that too. I would have one of these for every member of the family too.

3. Book lights. These are great to have on hand to read. I would give these to kids to read, color, draw, or anything else that will keep them occupied during a power outage.

4. LED and Battery Powered Lanterns. These are very handy to have. They are a favorite of my kids to use because the light is pretty bright. You can read and do a fair amount with the light they give off. If you are looking for something to hang from a ceiling or a hook, these lanterns will work for that and be safe to use. I would also check out these hanging camping lights for the same purpose.

5. Oil Lanterns. These are nice to have on hand. I would use the LED Lanterns if you are moving around much, but the oil lanterns are good to use in a room that needs light to move around in. As always, be careful using these around children. If you use oil lanterns, be sure to keep a supply of lamp wicks and fuel to keep these lanterns going. The oil lanterns have a lot of different choices including glass, metal, lamp oil, kerosene, and much more. This is my preferred lantern, but you should choose what works best for you.

6. Candles. Candles are great for lighting up an area and keeping the dark out. Candles can be reassuring to those who are afraid of the dark. While candles that smell are good to burn, you really want long lasting, odorless candles. Plus. smelly candles can be overwhelming after awhile. I would stock up on plain white tapered candles, emergency candles, and these 100+ hour emergency candles.

7. Propane Lanterns. Propane lanterns are good to have in an emergency situation. I would not use these indoors unless you have excellent ventilation. However, these are very good to have working outside or having to be in a tent for any length of time.

8. Battery Powered String Lights. These will be like candles. They will provide a nice glow for a room and will make the power outage less scary especially for kids. These may not seem important, but I would keep a few on hand to help light a bedroom or a bathroom.

9. Solar Powered Lights. Whether you use indoor or outdoor solar powered lights, I would keep a good stock of these on hand. The power of the solar lights will vary, but they are rechargeable which is ideal in a situation with no power. As long as you are getting some light during the day, you can run these at night until everyone goes to bed. Just make sure you are charging these outside or by a southern exposed window to get the best charge during the day.

With any kind of light, you need to use some common sense. Battery or solar powered lights would be your best choice for emergency situations. They will not be dangerous to use most of the time and would be a brighter light to use. They are generally rechargeable or will just need new batteries.

If you do use candles, oil lanterns, or propane lanterns, you need to have good ventilation, exercise caution, and be careful where you use them. You need to keep children away from these things until they can understand the dangers involved with using gas and fire. You need to make sure nothing gets smoky. Fuel containers need to be free from damage and in appropriate containers.

I realize some of you have generators and your lighting options would be better. Most plug-in lights take minimal wattage and would not drain a generator. However, I would still want to use non-electric lighting instead of wasting the fuel from a generator on lights. That is your choice though.

What is your lighting preference when the power is out?

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Sunday, November 26, 2017

Sunday Thoughts - November 26

Happy Sunday Everyone!

I didn't promise consistency in this post being weekly and I am sticking to it. We have been busy just trying to get as much done as humanly possible outside on the weekends. Well, let me rephrase that. Rob has been busting his behind to get as much done outside on the weekends as possible. I just help him when he needs help or thinks of something I can do. We can't hardly do anything outside after work now unless we have lights on us.

I am fairly handy, but let's face it. Rob is so much better at fix-it projects and projects in general than I am. I can garden, raise chickens, and fix simple things. He sees problems and things that just need taking care of and he does it. Since he likes everything working the way it is suppose to (I do, but I have a tendency towards just dealing with it as is), he does a lot of fixing and repairing. I do know he is sick of fixing and repairing too.

However, the wiring for the old hog barn and the new chicken coop are done! Woo hoo! Since Rob replaced a lot of wiring, replaced a breaker box, replaced a door, and we dug a trench for conduit for the new chicken coop, this project was a bit more labor intensive than we thought. We also both agree we should have done it a few months ago. Who knew that November weather was going to be crappy until Thanksgiving weekend?

The chicken coop now has light so kids can see at night to do chores, the chickens can lay longer if we want them to, and we can run a heat lamp if we need to. We can also see inside the old hog barn to get feed, see outside between buildings to get water, and do whatever else needs to be done. Everyone is happy!

If he has been working so hard, what have I been doing? Good question! I have been putting plastic on the windows and cleaning some of the windows as I go. I have been working on the part of the basement with the laundry room, food storage, and general storage. I have a lot to do to get it better organized. Yesterday, I moved all the cleaning supplies to the laundry part and moved the food to the food storage part. I have stuff scattered everywhere down there. I also threw some things in the garbage, give away box, and scrap pile. The whole basement is on the list to get done this winter and that will be quite the project.

I spend every weekend doing laundry on Saturday and baking bread on Sunday. Usually I also steam eggs on Sunday and bake muffins/granola bars/banana bread too. Everyone takes a lunch during the week so we need things for lunch, snack, and breakfast.

I did dig up the potatoes finally on November 8th. They looked great and I have them spread out on a piece of plywood drying for almost a week. We started having problems with them a few days ago. Some of them started to mildew, turn soft, and rot which I never had that problem before. We have theories including I should have knocked more of the dirt off of them or maybe they did freeze in the ground. Not sure, but I will make a better effort next year to have the potatoes out of the ground before first freeze.

I get asked a lot why we do all this stuff and why do we do it all ourselves. One, we are fairly frugal people who do not like to hire people to do work we can do ourselves. Most of the time, we couldn't afford for someone else to do it anyway. Two, doing all these projects are a form of prepping and homesteading. We are learning skills and doing things the way we want them done. We know we have more projects than time, but that is life right now. Neither one of us is very good about sitting around doing nothing so we will always have things to do.

Today, we are also having a mini Thanksgiving meal. We are frying a twelve pound turkey which is always delicious! We are also having mashed potatoes, gravy, stuffing, green bean casserole, and apple crisp. I also have some leftover homemade cranberry sauce from Thursday at my parents that we will have with it. Yum!

In case you missed these blog posts:
What happens when it is all gone tomorrow?
Five Prepping Things to Accomplish in November
Plan Your Retirement Now and Secure Your Future
Stuck in Your Vehicle During a Snowstorm? 13 Things You Need To Do To Survive!

What have you been up to? Let me know!

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Stuck In Your Vehicle During A Snowstorm? 13 Things You Need To Do To Survive!


During a snowstorm, it is possible that you will be in the ditch or stuck on the road. You might hit an icy patch and slide into the ditch. You might hit a drift in the road and become stuck. You might have had some confidence you could make it home, but the snow is too high and you are stranded on the road. 

You could be leaving work and hear that the roads will be closed at 5:00 p.m. The snow is piling up and you are already hearing the roads are bad. The wind started blowing and the snow is sticking to the roads now. The roads are slick and snow plows are trying to keep up, but the snow is coming down too fast. The road departments are going to pull the plows off the road pretty soon. 

You decide to try to get home. You have surely driven in worse weather before. You know you need to go slow and watch out for the other drivers. You get a few miles out of town and notice some cars in the ditch. You think they must have been going too fast. You keep the speed down, but you are starting to have problems seeing the road. All of a sudden, you slide around on the road and start spinning in circles. You find yourself in the ditch very quickly. 

Now what do you do? 

1. Call for help. You should always make sure your cell phone is charged and this is one of the reasons why. If your insurance has roadside assistance, call them and see if you can be towed. You can call 911. You can call your favorite tow truck company. You can do a Google search quickly for local towing companies. You can turn on your location setting for your phone to find the closest towing companies and any other help you might need. 

2. Call a family member or friend. You should let someone know you are in the ditch. When you are going somewhere in the winter with potential snow and ice forecasted, you should always let someone know where you are going and when you should be expected or at home. If you end up in the ditch or stuck on the road, please let someone know. They may worry about you, but someone will know that you are still alive and awaiting help.

3. Keep an eye on the gas tank. This is winter and your gas tank should always be above half full, but sometimes that doesn't happen. You should make sure you have enough gas to keep the car running and stay warm. 

4. Run the car at intervals to stay warm. You should run the car at 15 minute intervals to stay warm. Always crack a window when running the car to avoid any carbon monoxide poisoning due to a plugged or blocked exhaust on the car. 

5. Do not leave the car unless help has arrived or is just across the road. Do not try to get help on your own unless you are very close (within 200 feet) to a house or farm place. You can easily get stranded in the snow if the snow is too high or you are on unfamiliar ground, risking hypothermia and frostbite. If you are in danger, use your best common sense. Leaving the car could put you at risk also.

6. Use your hazard lights on your car to signal for help. You should keep some roadside flares in your car to signal for help also. 

7. Do not use your cell phone more than you need to. Unless you can keep charging your phone in your car without wearing down your battery or carry a portable charger, keep the phone use limited. You want to be able to keep in touch with loved ones and help. Keep some word search puzzle books and reading material in the car with you to keep you entertained and off your phone.

8. Stay warm. Do what you can to stay warm while waiting for help. Use a blanket, keep a hat on your head, gloves on your hands, and use hand warmers and foot warmers to stay warm. Run the heat on the car for 15 minutes on/15 minutes off to stay warm. Keep boots in the vehicle if you are not already wearing them to keep your feet warmer.

9. Keep hydrated. When you leave home, you should have a full water bottle with you. Keep sipping on the water and stay hydrated. Being dehydrated can lead to bad decision making, health issues, and other problems which you can not afford to have in a situation like this. 

10. While you may only be stranded for 1-2 hours, plan on being stranded for longer. Tow bans can and do occur when the weather is bad enough and travel is not advised. If you are traveling and know the roads are closed, find a place to stay in town or stay at home/work. If you are traveling on closed roads, they will not come for you until the next morning or at their convenience. You could be stranded for several hours even with no tow bans. If you do decide to travel in bad weather, fill your tank with gas, buy some bottles of water, and grab some snacks. You may need them further on down the road. 

11. Use your vehicle emergency kit if you need to. You may need all those things or you may not need anything, but please use it. 

12. Stay aware and be ready to defend yourself. While most people are well-meaning and want to help you, there are people who just like to prey on the helpless. While you are in a situation needing help, you are not helpless. Be ready to defend yourself against those who would do you harm and be weary of anyone you do not know. Your life could depend on it. 

13. Do not try to dig yourself out or get yourself out of the ditch. Even with 4x4 or all-wheel drive, you may end up getting yourself even more stuck. Snow is pretty soft and you can sink in the ditch pretty far trying to get yourself out. If you get stuck on a drift, you may be able to back off of it. However, most people are "hung up" on the drift because they lack the tire traction to get back off the drift. If you are stuck in snow too high, you will need to wait for the snow plow to go by and still might need a tow truck to pull you out. Either way, wait for help and have them help you get out instead of getting more stuck. 

These are the main things you need to do to survive being stranded in your vehicle during a storm. Your top priorities to stay alive are to stay safe, warm, dry, and hydrated. You don't know how long you will be stranded and you need to be ready for anything. As always, use your best judgment and common sense to stay alive!

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Friday, November 17, 2017

Plan Your Retirement Now and Secure Your Future!


Plan Your Retirement Now and Secure Your Future!

This is an unpaid sponsored post. I believe strongly in saving for retirement as social security will not likely be enough to cover your expenses in retirement. Please check out this website and the cool tools they have to help you save for retirement!
As we grow closer to the end of yet another year many begin to take stock of our financial situations. It is tough being pulled in so many directions - children’s college funds, vacation and family outings, home ownership and more. But it’s important not to neglect long-term savings for your retirement years. I didn’t really take retirement savings seriously until I turned 40. Now I feel like I am having to catch up on my contributions to my retirement fund.  

Understanding retirement needs can be confusing sometimes and may feel like an overwhelming and impossible task. That’s why I am sharing these simple tips for helping you get started with easy-to-understand resources at AceYourRetirement.org. Here are seven things to consider to help you maximize your retirement savings.

  1. Minimize debt - but not at the expense of paying into your 401k or other retirement accounts. The less debt-load you have during your retirement, the more you’ll be able to make your retirement dollars stretch.
  2. Don’t rely solely on Social Security - in fact people are often recommended to wait until up to age 70 to collect Social Security to allow benefits to grow more.
  3. Consider whether downsizing your living quarters makes sense once children are grown and out of the house.
  4. Make sure your beneficiary designations are up-to-date and talk to your spouse/partner to make sure everyone is on the same page.
  5. If you’ve been divorced but not remarried you may be eligible to Social Security benefits from your ex-spouse.
  6. Enroll in a retirement savings plan. Even a little bit held out from each paycheck can really add up.
  7. Never contribute less to your 401k account than your employer matches if they offer a matching program. Save more if possible and increase your savings by 1% per year whenever possible.


As we approach a new year it’s important to take stock of your current situation, and make adjustments where needed. Pop over to AceYourRetirement.org and get personalized, simple tips on how to jumpstart your retirement savings. It was so helpful to me to see a couple areas that I could adjust to help improve the financial situation of our family. I need to increase my contributions to my 401K that is offered at my work. I currently contribute 2% and will be increasing it to 3-5% in January. I also need to get my student loans paid off to so I can put that money in savings.
I wasn’t surprised to find out that I was the only one struggling with what to do with our finances. I double-checked to make sure that we were maxing out what my employer will match and we found out we needed to adjust our contributions slightly. Today, many Americans households have virtually no retirement savings. This shortfall is especially critical for people in their late 40s and older, who are only years away from retirement.  Americans know they should be focused on the long-term, with nearly 6 in 10 (58%) preferring to save for retirement over something more short-term, a vacation (40%).  But approximately 2 in 5 households headed by people age 55-64—over 9 million households—have no retirement assets saved at all. Among workers with access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, more than 7 million don’t participate. 28% of people with access to an employer-sponsored plan do not contribute enough money to reach their company match, meaning they are essentially leaving free money on the table.
Taking steps to take control of your retirement planning could have a positive impact in many areas of your life. More than half of people in their 40s and 50s say that feeling more confident about saving for retirement would help them feel less stressed (54%). And 46% would be happier knowing they are taking care of their family’s future. I know I feel better after working through the AARP website AceYourRetirement.org. We’ve been savvy with our money - paid off car loans ahead of schedule, lived almost debt free for awhile...I know we are capable of achieving large financial goals. But I just wasn’t sure where to start. Now I feel much more confident and you can too.

Where will you start with your retirement planning? What’s your biggest challenge today?

Thanks for reading,
Erica

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Five Prepping Things To Accomplish in November


November is here already. Actually we are already half way into the month because time just flew by! Harvest is just about over with. The gardens are done unless you have cold frames. Everything outside is tucked away, battened down, or cleaned up. November is the month to start focusing on the inside things.

Prepping is a lot of little things that add up to big things. You need to work on the inside of the house as well as the outside of the house. Late fall and winter is a great time to get started on the indoor prepping tasks as well as working on some skills.

Five Prepping Things to Accomplish in November:


1. Practice walking around your house in the dark. While this may not seem important, it really is. When the power goes out, you will need to be able to get around in the dark. If you think someone is in your home, you will need the familiarity and the darkness of your home for your advantage.

2. Stock up on baking supplies. November and December is a good time to get your baking supplies stockpile built up. Brown sugar, sugar, flour, cake mixes, frosting, and chocolate chips are all at their best prices right now. Keep your eye out for the loss leaders on the front pages of your grocery advertisements and get stocked up.

3. Get the inside of your house ready for winter. Put plastic on the inside of the windows. Get extra blankets and quilts on the beds. Put 100% cotton or flannel sheets on the beds to make them warmer. Have your supplies ready to go and tested in case of power outages, blizzards, and ice storms.

4. Time to get your prepper reading started. I know some of you read all year round, but some people really like to get their reading done over the winter. I know I do because I am too tired to read much over the summer. Whether you decide to read fiction or nonfiction, pick up some good books to get your knowledge level raised a little more. The more you know, the more you can do. Some books I recommend are:

Prepper's Long-Term Survival Guide by Jim Cobb
The Prepper's Pocket Guide: 101 Easy Things You Can Do to Ready Your Home for a Disaster by Bernie Carr
Prepper Supplies Checklist: A Simple Guide to Emergency Preparedness by Nettie David
Prepper's Total Grid Failure Handbook by Alan and Arlene Fiebig

5. Make certain everyone has good, warm winter clothing. I know how it is. Kids grow fast. Gloves and hats disappear. A boot has a hole in it. Socks aren't warm enough or thick enough. Make sure everyone's winter needs are covered and their items are in good repair. Add some more sweaters and sweatshirts to the list too to keep everyone warm and cozy without having to turn up the thermostat!


Also check out:
Five Prepping Things to Accomplish in October
Five Prepping Things to Accomplish in September
Five Prepping Things to Accomplish in August

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Friday, November 10, 2017

What happens when it is all gone tomorrow?


In your lifetime, something will probably happen to you that will make you wonder what you are going to do next. You could lose your job. You could be in a car accident and not be able to work or pay bills. You could have a tornado or hurricane wipe out your home and everything you have worked for. You could get divorced and be left with nothing. A loved one could be taken from you and you have to figure out life without them.

So much can happen that begs me to think about this. I have been through at least two of those scenarios. I have had to ask myself "What happens when it is all gone tomorrow?"

The worst thing about this question and these scenarios is that you have very little to no warning. You rarely get to pick when something bad and life-changing gets to happen to you. Very few people know they have cancer before they are diagnosed. Many people have shown up to work only to find the doors locked and find out they are unemployed. The weather service is pretty accurate, but you may only have days to a week to find out how devastating a storm can be. Bad things will happen that will completely change your life tomorrow.

We can prepare for just about anything. We can have supplies built up, plans in place, emergency funds and savings on hand, and another place to go to. We can take care of ourselves physically, mentally, and spiritually. We can draw up wills and living trusts to take care of our loved ones. We have insurance for health, vehicles, and life to take care of any contingencies. By our very natures, we like to plan ahead to be prepared for any event that could alter our lives.

But we can't prepare for everything. Something may happen that will wipe away everything we have worked, prepared for, and lived for. In all seriousness, that is the most devastating thing to have to go through. You don't know where to start or how to start building your life again. You don't know where to go. You don't know what the next step is. You are in shock. Disbelief and fear will take over.

You have to move on. That will be tough to do for a lot of people, but you have to. There are things you can do, however, to help you process this major life change and start to create a new life for you.

1. It will take some time to process what happened. Your mind will need time to process, recover, and make a plan. Give yourself that time, but don't dwell on the negative for too long. You probably have other people relying on you and you need to get on with things for their sake.

2. While these are bad circumstances, you need to stay positive and hope for the best while being realistic. You probably have others depending on you to take care of them and they need your best. Being bitter and angry will not serve you in any way and it will not make the circumstances any better.

3. Take care of the basics. If you are a prepper or survivalist, you know you need shelter, water, and food first and foremost if you are in this kind of situation. You need to find shelter, water, and food to stay alive. Next you need to stay warm if you are in that kind of climate. You need to take care of the basics so those depending on you will be taken care of and you will feel better too.

4. Take the next step. When your mind is under stress, you may not know what to do next. You will feel numb. Write down everything you need to do and what needs to be taken care of. Write down even the smallest things to do that you think you will remember. You are under stress so you may not remember those things. Pick one thing on that list and do that thing.

5. Prioritize what you need to do. What is the most important thing that needs to get done? If you have the basics covered, you need to pick the next thing to get done. Whether it is making legal or medical decisions, applying for unemployment benefits, shutting off services to save money, finding another job, calling insurance, or finding a new home, you need to get those things done. Figure out what is most important and do it.

6. Accept the kindness of others. There are people who will want to help you if they know you are in need. Please accept their help whether it is a place to stay, a meal, a shoulder to cry on, good advice, or a voice of reason. Sometimes the price of the help can be high so you need to decide that, but do not turn down help if you can use it. The help offered will make the burden lighter.

7. Do not make any "snap" decisions unless it is an emergency. In times like this, snap decisions can lead to regret. You may be under stress, but you need to use reason and common sense to make the next decision. You have yourself to consider as well as probably family to consider. If you are struggling to make a decision, ask your family and friends for their advice and knowledge. However, because I believe in this, do not ignore your gut reaction. If you know, deep down, what you should do and you know that is not from paranoia or fear, go with your gut and do it.

8. Seek information and good advice. As I said in #7, you should make informed decisions. You are in a situation that may seem like life or death or you may not have a lot of options, but you need to be informed. What are your options? What is the best treatment? What can I do to support my family? Where would be the best place to move to? These are all questions (and there are definitely more) that deserve well-researched, well-informed answers.

9. Don't be afraid of other people and their reactions. You have to do what is best for you and your family. You may make people sad or angry about your decisions and/or your plan of action. They may try to make you feel guilty or feel stupid about the decisions you make. Don't let these people have that power. It is one thing to feel like you need to take care of your parents (or something similar), but it is another thing if people make you feel like you can't leave or you have to accept your circumstances. You have to take care of you and make the best decisions for you and your family.

These ideas and things to do are not a complete plan. These are things you can do to start moving on with your life when it seems like hope is lost and/or you have lost everything. Taking the next step and moving on with your life may seem like the hardest thing to do, but for your sake you have to do it.

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Printfriendly

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...