Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Could We Handle Food Rationing Now?


In WWI (somewhat) and WWII definitely, food rationing was one of the few ways that governments in the United States and Britain could keep the soldiers fed as well as its citizens. Everyone was expected to do their share and stay within the guidelines of food rationing. In addition to the food rationing, citizens were heavily encouraged to "do their part" in their duty to their country by growing food and making every bit count.

Citizens were encouraged to make do. They were encouraged to start their own Victory garden and supplement their own rations. They were encouraged to forage and eat food they weren't accustomed to thinking as food. Food waste was a sin and they were encouraged to stretch their rations as far as possible.

In Britain, food rationing started in 1939 and lasted well past the war. They were under food rationing until 1954 while Britain recovered from the war. Food rationing started in 1942 and ended in the United States in August 1945 except for sugar which lasted until 1947. Soviet Union was under food rationing from 1941 - 1947. Fruits and vegetables were not rationed, but could be restricted for lack of supply unless you grew your own. For the most part, governments found out that their citizens were healthier under the food rationing system than before and after WWII.

Could we handle food rationing now if and when it should happen again? That is hard to say. Many people would have a very difficult time under the food rationing system. Processed food is much more prevalent now than it was during the 1940s. People are not as creative with food as they could be. Cooking from scratch is becoming a lost art. People are also not nearly as patriotic as they were during the first two world wars.

People are used to having food when they want it and how they want it. People in general are much more impatient now. Imagine being told you can only have so much food and you have to make a choice about what food you can have. Plus, people were encouraged to eat less meat during the war and choose cheaper cuts of meat to eat. Meat is a hefty part of a lot of diets now. People would have to make some severe changes to their diet that probably would not go over well.

Obesity is also a problem in the United States and Britain now.  People are used to eating a lot of food, making not so good food choices, consuming a lot of sugar, and not moving enough to deal with the excess food. Food rationing would be a tough adjustment for those people who suffer from obesity. If you struggle with your weight, now would a good time to start making changes before they are forced upon you.

Processed food is much more accessible now than 70 plus years ago. We also have a lot of manmade ingredients that were not even available back then. Processed food and these ingredients have brought about the advent of cheaper and easier to eat food. This definitely cheapens the cost of food, but depending on why we are being rationed we may not have access to the ingredients.You might also see more processed food being rationed because the ability to make it might be restricted.

Creative cooking and cooking from scratch is almost a lost art. While many people during those two wars were well-acquainted with cooking from scratch, now many people rely on processed foods or premade meals from the grocery store. Eating out is also at an all-time high as parents find it easier to go through the drive through or stop at a sandwich shop to feed the family. Food rationing would be a shock to those that would have to learn how to meal plan, read recipes, and cook creatively for possibly the first time in their lives.

We have many, many more people in our population now than we did then. We have more mouths to feed and more people in the inner cities who do not have access to cooking, growing, or forging food. While poverty existed in the 1930s and 1940s, we have still have a widespread and bigger problem with poverty today. Many people struggle to eat every day and rely on soup kitchens, food pantries, shelters, and the kindness of people just to get fed. What would happen to those people and those places when food rationing happens? Would the government provide for those places and for the people who need them? Would churches and charities still be able to support them? There is no clear cut answer on this problem.

SNAP benefits would certainly be reduced to reflect rationing as money would not be as available for this program. We would need to divert money to our country's defense and military. While individual states control what SNAP benefits could be spent on, the benefit amount would certainly be reduced. With the advent of food rationing, I could also see the government controlling how they could be spent. Only certain foods would be covered and nothing that would seem like a "luxury" grocery item.

People are also not nearly as patriotic now as they were during those wars. The contempt for our government now is at an all-time high. Take away or reduce someone's SNAP benefits and you could have a riot on your hands. Tell people they need to do their "duty" for whatever situation brings on food rationing and reduce their consumption of food, not have certain products available, or be restricted on what they can buy - I cannot even imagine what would happen. We have lost our loyalty and ability to stand as Americans against the world and do what is necessary to come out on top. The reaction could be violent and intense.

But mostly, we have lost our ability to be self-reliant. I love seeing homesteading, prepping, and self-sufficiency on the rise because more people are interested in stockpiling food, growing and foraging for food, raising livestock, canning and preserving their own food. Those are the things that will help you survive food rationing. Doing what you can to supplement food rationing and stretching food as far as it can go will only serve you well. Managing food waste will be critical. Being self-reliant will be the only way to survive food rationing.

So, could we handle food rationing now? I think we can, but it will be a huge adjustment and will probably have some riots happen as some groups of people do not handle well being told what to do even if the cause is great. However, we all have adjustments we need to make, skills we need to learn and maintain, and preparations to make. We need to be ready just in case because the event that brings on food rationing here will not only affect us as a country, but globally as well.

Thanks for reading,
Erica

Related links:
Nine Ways to Beat The Food Rationing System When It Happens Again
Ten Lessons Learned About Food From The Depression and Wartime



Sunday, April 15, 2018

What Place Does Extreme Frugality Have In Your Life? How Can You Live In Extreme Frugality?


One of the ideas that have been on my mind has been extreme frugality. I am currently in saving money mode (which is normal) while trying to amp up my frugality game. I am back to using paper coupons, digital coupons, Ibotta, SavingStar, and much more. I'm paying a lot more attention to sale flyers and really deciding if I need any of that which, by the way, is in direct conflict with the stockpiler in me!

However, along with being frugal, I want to have a bigger impact on my savings and my spending game. To save more money and spend less money, you have to make more meaningful decisions about where your money goes and how your money is being spent. In short, you have to become more extreme in your frugal living game.

Frugal living has several aspects. One of the biggest aspects in frugal living and practicing extreme frugality is daily living. You have to examine every decision you make every day. Because being frugal is not just saving money on just big purchases, but being consciously aware of the money being spent on small daily purchases and how you are using the items you already have or purchased.

For whatever reason you decide to practice extreme frugality, you need to know and understand your reasons. Those reasons will be your motivation. The reasons can be many, but not limited to:


  • To rein in your spending
  • To pay down debt
  • To purchase a car or home
  • To save money for college
  • To save money for retirement
  • To save money for emergencies
  • To make a conscious effort to not spend money
  • To make frugality apart of your life

Whatever reason(s) you decide to practice extreme frugality, you need to know why you are doing it. Write down those reasons and place them everywhere you need to see them (office, computer, wallet, kitchen, etc.).

Now, that you know your reason for being extreme in your frugality, you need to find ways to tighten your spending. Some ideas to tighten up your frugal game could be:


  • Asking yourself to wait 3-7 days before purchasing anything besides necessities
  • Asking yourself if you have something already on hand before purchasing anything
  • Making a conscious decision to purchase used if at all possible
  • Eliminating food waste and examining if food scraps have another use
  • Using reusable items before purchasing single use items like water bottles and drinks
  • Only purchasing clothes when something needs to be replaced and can't be repaired
  • Using wash cloths and rags for paper towels, napkins, facial tissues, and more
  • Eliminating electrical use when possible and using solar or hand power instead
  • Walking or biking instead of driving the car
  • Making your own cleaners and beauty products
  • No more eating out and tightening the grocery budget
  • And so much more...

Every decision you make in a day should be examined for frugal reasons. There are always ways to save more money.

There may not be things you are willing to do to save more money. That is okay, but ask yourself why you are not willing to go that far to save money or not spend money. If saving/not spending money will hurt yourself or harm your family, then you shouldn't be doing it. There is a fine line in extreme frugality and withholding a critical necessity or service to not spend money is crossing the line.

Extreme frugality may bring on extreme cheapness. In some cases, being cheap is not a bad thing. People may view you are cheap just because you are not willing to buy something, go to a "party" for the sole purchase of buying something, or will not go out bar hopping. That is not being cheap, that is being frugal. Being cheap is only spending what you have to without thought to others or yourself and potential causing harm. Being cheap is also spending the least amount of money possible even though what you are purchasing is pure crap and you will be buying a new one when that item breaks easily. Being cheap is also taking advantage of situation to get something free or get the upper hand over someone just so you don't have to spend anything. I could go on about being cheap and sometimes it is a good thing, but not usually.

You want to be fair in your extreme frugality. You are doing this for yourself and your family. Being cheap is not always being fair to yourself or others. However, in your frugality, look for the free things you can get. Being extremely frugal does not mean your life is over with or that you can not have any fun. Take advantage of these free things:


  • Look for free things you can do or take home. 
  • Take advantage of your library for books and movies. 
  • Look for events around the area that do not cost you anything but maybe gas money. 
  • Look for things that people are giving away for free. 
  • Be a curb shopper, dumpster diver, free garage sale box looker. 
  • Be creative with what you have and what you find.
  • Have staycations often and keep them as frugal as possible.
  • Learn new skills with items you already have.
  • Don't say no when someone wants to treat you or your family.

You can still live a full life even though you have your nose to the extremely frugal grindstone. You can still have fun. You can still be involved in things you love, but just be conscious of what it is asking of you financially. Some groups and things are fun, but if you are constantly bleeding money to be in while trying to actively save money, something is wrong. You may have to let those things go for a time while you are being extremely frugal.

While being extremely frugal is very good thing, you still have some things to keep in mind. Being an extreme frugalister can make your mind think some funny things. Like you shouldn't throw anything away or give anything away. Like you should be a hoarder. That couldn't be farther from the truth! Yes, by all means, keep what you can use or think of a use for. However, if you have things you cannot use at all, you should give them away, sell them, donate them, or responsibly recycle them. Please don't be an episode of one of those shows! If you have stuff not serving you, do something with it. Your home shouldn't be a fire hazard because of the stuff you own.

Lastly, you have to be intentional in your extreme frugal game. You have be content with what you already have. If you are use to shopping a lot, you need to figure out why and stop. You have to be happy with what you have and not use shopping as stress relief. You have to be content with what you have and not be envious of what the neighbors have. You do not need to have the latest, greatest things. That is not being content. You need to be content with the ten year old car and a house without a pool.  You need to be happy with wearing out your clothes without buying this season's newest fashions. You need to be okay with bringing your own lunch and not going out to lunch every day or every week. You have to be content with what you have and your decisions to save money so you can achieve your goals. Otherwise, being extremely frugal will not be an easy process for you.

Extreme frugality is not for everyone, but everyone can do it. You can try it for a short amount of time or the rest of your life. You never know when you will need to be extremely frugal so being extremely frugal now will only serve you later. I would encourage you to give it a try and make it work for you!

Thanks for reading,
Erica

Other articles on frugality:
Are You Frugal? 
50 Ways You Are Not Being Frugal
Is It A Need Or A Want? What Should You Spend Your Money On?


Monday, April 9, 2018

Improving Soil with Chicken Litter


(In March, I wrote an article for the Rootsy Network where I am a guest contributor. I love what they are doing over there! If you are into homesteading, self-reliance, and do-it-yourself, you must check them out!)


Most homesteaders struggle to find ways to dispose of all the waste that livestock can produce. One of the easiest ways to dispose of the waste is to add it to the garden. Gardening is fun, but gardening is a lot less fun when you are fighting your soil to grow a decent crop. Most gardens need soil amendments. Used bedding from your chickens and other livestock is a great way to amend your soil.
Where I live, we have heavy black clay soil. It doesn’t till well, hold a lot of moisture in the spring and early summer dries out during the summer into a hard brick and can be impossible to weed unless it is wet. On top of that, this soil doesn’t seem to grow good produce because root crops are fighting for space in the soil and plants struggle to establish good roots. The garden needs a good dose of fertilizer every year. I also find this kind of soil needs some acidity to balance the alkaline although the alkaline doesn’t seem to affect the growth of most plants.
Thanks for reading,
Erica


Thursday, April 5, 2018

Dear Preppers, Please Don't Ignore Your Eyes!


As preppers, we try to prepare for what we can. We stock up food, water, and first aid supplies. We try to learn and practice new skills. We read and read some more books and blogs. We do what we can.

However, all the prepping in the world will not do you any good if you can't see well.

This happened to me recently. I noticed over the last couple of months that I was overly tired at night, having headaches frequently and lasting for quite a while, and reading/doing computer work at night was getting difficult. I didn't take me too long to realize that I should probably schedule myself an eye doctor visit.

I haven't been to the eye doctor in about 15ish years. I simply didn't see a need to go if I wasn't having any issues. I am pretty good about taking my kids every year because all of them wear glasses for one reason or another. I wore glasses for a couple of years as a kid, but I grew out of that problem. However, 15 years is too long to go without going to the eye doctor for myself.

I found out that I will need glasses for seeing up close and far away, but a pair of cheap reading glasses will work just fine for now. Down the road, I will need more and I am aware of that. I also have a bit of a light sensitivity issue, but I wear sunglasses religiously so that should be fine. I can 100% attribute this problem to being on the computer a lot, a mobile device that I use too much, and being a bookworm. My eyes are simply tired of working that hard to see.

As preppers, our eyes are one of our most important assets.We need to see and see well! How else are you going to know the difference between an edible plant and a poisonous plant? How are you going to know if someone is a friend or foe from a distance? And if you have to shoot something, you want to hit the target the first time, right? You certainly wouldn't want to confuse salt with sugar! You need your sight!

I know some of you are going to be stubborn about this. Even if you go to the eye doctor, you aren't going to wear glasses. Most people can wear contracts, but I still think you need to have a pair of glasses on hand. Some people would be candidates for eye sight correction surgery which would be worth looking into if you can afford it.

With having a prepper mindset, here are some things I would recommend:

1. If you are a contact wearer, get as many sets of contacts as you can. I understand prescriptions change, but you are better off with them than without them. Also, if you are contact wearer, you should have 2-3 pairs of glasses as a backup in case you run out of contacts or contract an eye disease like pink eye.

2. As mentioned in #1, you should have at least 2-3 pairs of glasses. Glasses can be really expensive, however, there are ways to save money. You can ask for your prescription from your eye doctor and order glasses online for a small fraction of the cost of glasses from the eye doctor. You can look at places like EyeBuyDirect or GlassesUSA for glasses that are much cheaper than in office.

3. Ask for your exact prescription from the eye doctor and keep it somewhere safe. You should have in your home medical files and on a card in your wallet. You just never know where and when you might have to replace your glasses!

4. Wear sunglasses. Sunglasses are important to your eyes too. You will not strain your eyes so much in the sunlight and will avoid snow blindness in the winter while driving/being outdoors. If you need prescription sunglasses to see, you can shop at those aforementioned places for a good deal.

5. Always wear eye protection when working with shop equipment, chain saws, guns, and chemicals. You should always protect your eyes when there is a chance you could injure them in anyway. Eye injuries can ruin your sight, cause blindness, or cause you to lose an eye altogether. Not worth the risk!

6. Along with having glasses, you should invest in a good eye glasses repair kit. While you might not be able to fix everything, you can replace or tighten screws, replace nose pads, and more.

I encourage you all to make an appointment to your local eye doctor today. You really don't want to be in situation where you can't see or read well and you knew you could have prevented it. You might also feel better when you start wearing glasses too!

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Tuesday, March 20, 2018

We Are All Preppers, But Some of Us Don't Know It Yet


Prepping is what it is. Exactly what it is. Prepping is getting ready for the future. We are mentally, physically, and spiritually getting ready for something that is going to happen. Whether that "something" is in an hour, a day, a week, a year, or sometime in the future, we are getting ready for it.

We can be preparing for anything:
  • We put money away for a rainy day. They are getting ready for something that could happen and they would need that money for. That is prepping.
  • New parents stock up on diapers, wipes, and formula so they don't run out. That is prepping. 
  • We shop garage sales and clearance racks for clothing and the next size up clothing for our kids so we are ready for them when they grow into them. That is prepping. 
  • We find a good deal at the grocery store and stock up on that item to have in the future. That is prepping.
  • We put money away for kids' college and other future expenses. That is prepping.
  • We save money for retirement. That is prepping. 
  • We pay for all kinds of insurance for anything that could happen. That is prepping.
  • We go camping and decide to "unplug and unwind" for the weekend. That is prepping. 
  • We take a first aid and CPR class. That is prepping.
  • We take a hunter's safety course. That is prepping.
  • We take up a new hobby and learn a new skill. That is prepping. 
  • We buy groceries for the week so we have food to eat. That is prepping. 

So many of the everyday things we do is prepping. Many people are so turned off by the term "prepper", but really we are all preppers in some way. We don't think about being a prepper because we are just doing things to prepare for the future or some future event.

While many people think of prepping as:
  • Stockpiling food
  • Building a bug out shelter
  • Owning a gun and several other weapons
  • Learning survival skills
  • Learning first aid
  • Turning the home into a fortress
  • Growing food 
  • Running drills
  • Making plans for evacuation, security, etc.

There is so much more to prepping. Trust me, those things just listed are important too. However, when you talk to hardcore preppers, they will tell you that they find the first list just as important as the second list. They often do things from both lists in the same day.

Prepping is what it is. It is getting ready for the future. We are all have different visions and paths for the future. Our lives change and we are always getting ready for the next stage in life. What you do and what you prepare for can be different than that of your neighbors, but you are both doing what you can to get ready for the future.

Some of us just may see "life" in the future: kids, jobs, college, weddings, homes, and retirement. Some of us may see more in the future - what can happen if something else happens. All of us prepare for the future so we don't have to worry about what can happen. We all have varying levels of preparedness. There is nothing wrong with that.

While some people just see "life" in the future, some of us see more. We see natural disasters, job loss, an uncertain economy, political and civil unrest, global problems, and much more. We choose to take our preparedness to the next level. We look for ways to be self-sufficient and self-reliant. We look for ways to intentionally be ready for what we think could be coming. Again, there is nothing wrong with that either.

Some of us do not see ourselves as preppers. We may identify as gardeners, hunters, cooks, woodworkers, and more. We may have fun tinkering in the shop. We may like to try new recipes on the grill and love to cook over an open fire. We may find target practice to be relaxing. We might think watching YouTube videos on how to do things or how people used to live in history fun. We may enjoy working on our own vehicles. We grow plants in our apartments.

The funny thing is that those are all "prepping" skills and learning. We may not see it as being prepared for the future, but those skills and learning may come in very handy in the future. When the power is out, but you can still cook a meal on the grill. You can cook a meal with whatever food you have on hand or in the garden when you aren't able to leave home. Your car needs a new battery and you know how to replace it. You can build a fire to keep warm. Any skill you learn will always come in handy sometime, but you just never know when.

Prepping happens every day and in ways we don't even realize. We don't realize that we are prepping because we just see what we are doing as getting ready for the future. The future can happen at any time. How much you choose to prepare and how far you want to take preparedness will depend upon you which is what separates preppers from each other. There is always someone you think will be too extreme in their prepping. There is always going to be that person you think should be doing more to get their act together. There are many levels of preparedness and only you can decide what level you are comfortable being on.

Just know this: We are all preppers, but some of us don't know it yet.

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Prepper's Survival Navigation Book Review


The Prepper's Survival Navigation: Find Your Way with Map and Compass as Well as Stars, Mountains, Rivers and Other Wilderness Signs by Walter Glen Martin is a great tool to explore the world around you. It is a resource book, a tool, and a great learning book for using maps, compasses, and other ways to find your way around. He also talks about wilderness survival while using these tools.

For someone who can use a map, but not much else, I found this book to be a great source of information. I can't wait to start hiking this Spring and use the methods Mr. Martin described in his book. While I have knowledge of compasses, I learned I was not using them right nor to their full potential. I also learned some new things in wilderness survival by reading this book that I hope to practice also. Because reading about skills and actually practicing skills are two different things.

One of the things I would recommend about this book is to actually practice what he writes about. The very first chapter is about finding north without a compass. Right away, you are learning to use your brain to find direction instead of using GPS or a gadget.

The next thing I would recommend is buying the items he suggests using. He gives very specific instructions on what to look for in a good compass and a map. I would follow those recommendations. Mr. Martin was raised in the mountains, has worked in the mountains, and still lives in the mountains. Safe to say, he is very skilled and knows what he is talking about.

The last thing I would recommend is to go camping and use the skills he is talking about. You should take the book with you and practice building a fire, finding north without a compass, looking for landmarks and natural signs to point you in the right direction, and relax without a lot of pressure on you. While you may not want to be a survival expert, having the skills to survive in the wilderness will only serve you in good ways.

I would highly recommend this book. I think Mr. Martin brings some new information to this prepping atmosphere while being clear and easy to follow in the skills he is trying to teach you. I greatly enjoyed this book and can't wait to learn some new skills!

Thanks for reading,
Erica


Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Nine Ways to Beat The Food Rationing System When It Happens Again


Right now, food seems to be plentiful in America. There is plenty of it in the stores and you hear stories of how much food is wasted from restaurants and grocery stores. However, there are some factors that could lead us to a rationing system in a hurry if something happened. Those things do not even have to be catastrophic for us to be rationed.

In most natural disasters such as hurricanes and flooding, Red Cross and FEMA dive right in to help. However, they will only serve meals and/or give out limited amounts of food and water. Yes, many other people donate food and money when things like this happen, but what if they couldn't?

In WWI, the Americans were not put on a rationing system, but were asked to eat more fresh fruits and vegetables and less meat and wheat products. In WWII, Americans were put on a rationing system that became stricter as the war went on. Even then, this country imported a lot of food and supply chains were disrupted. In addition to that, the troops needed food overseas that would ship and travel well. We were asked to give up or limit certain foods to feed our troops which we did because we were patriotic and felt it was our duty to do so. Certain foods were not available because they were not in season or able to grow in the United States.

In today's America, this seems like a foreign concept. Food is literally everywhere! However, we have situations that can happen to start having our food rationed. Most grocery stores have only three days of food on their shelves in their storage rooms. If a blizzard or some other weather storm happens, those shelves will be wiped out in hours. Our local grocery store can be very short on supplies on Sunday because a lot of people get groceries on Sundays.

Now, imagine if there is a disruption in the transportation system. No trucks bringing food to the stores means a limited supply or no food to buy.

Imagine if we went to war again. A good deal of our food or ingredients for our food is imported. Less food coming into our country means less food to buy. That will not go over well with some people.

Imagine if you could not actually get to the grocery store. Some people are accustomed to shopping every day instead of once a week or two weeks. When food is rationed, often gas and tires are rationed too when will stop someone from going to the store every day.

Food will start to be rationed. Just like when food was rationed before, there will be a learning curve. People will have to adjust and some people will not adjust well. People will have to learn how to cook again and grow their own food. Some of those skills are completely lost in our inner cities.

What can you do to the beat the rationing system?

1. Food Storage. Now, more than ever, you need to have a food stockpile. No one knows how long food would be rationed for. No one planned for WWII to last for four years. There are still people recovering from the hurricanes last season. Puerto Rico is still getting on their feet and depending on FEMA and donations to feed their people (as of this post). Having a food stockpile is critical and having a year's worth of food is not out of line.

2. Grow Your Own Food. You will have to become your own supplier. If you start gardening now, you will have the skills to grow your own food. You don't even need a garden per say, but it is better to have a plot of land to grow food. However, use containers. Grow lettuce and spinach in pots inside the house. Grow tomatoes on the balcony or the patio. There are many creative ways to grow your food.

3. Raise Your Eggs and Meat. If you can, have some laying hens for eggs. Grow a few meat chickens for your own pot and freezer. If you can, raise more than chickens. Ducks, geese, turkeys, pigs, goats, sheep, and cows can all be raised for butchering. You would be addressing one area of food that was also severely rationed by the end of WWII and probably would be again.

4. Foraging For Food. You should learn to identify weeds and other edibles that can be cooked or eaten in a salad. This was done during both WWI and WWII with excellent results. A great book on foraging and identifying edibles is The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants by Samuel Thayer.  Learning how to tap trees for syrup and collecting nuts should be skills to learn now too.

5. Start Keeping Bees. Sugar was severely rationed in WWII. People are even more addicted to it now than they were then. Keeping bees and producing your own honey would easily help replace sugar or at least keep sugar for more important things. During the war, people would save their sugar for the holidays or very special occasions. They would do without sugar most of the time. We all could benefit from having less sugar in our diets too.

6. Learn To Preserve Your Own Food. Learning to can and dehydrate will become very important skills during a food rationing time. Again, this is a skill you need to learn and practice now. Start simple with jams and jellies and work your way up to making meals in a jar. Getting a good supply of canning jars and canning lids will be crucial too. Metal for those lids could be in short supply. There is non-metal lids to can with also, but they also take time to learn how to use.

7. Learn To Use Everything and Waste Nothing. We can be a very wasteful society nowadays and we really need to learn to use it all up. We need to learn to eat everything, re-purpose leftovers, compost scraps, and feed scraps to the animals.

8. Get Creative. You will have to learn to cook from scratch. You will have to learn how to use food in ways you never imagined. You will have to learn to eat more locally and seasonally. You may have to have odd food combinations at the supper table. Learn to be creative with food and keep an open mind about how to cook and use food.

9. Try New Foods Now. Never had turnips or rutabagas? They grow just about everywhere so now would be a good time to learn how to eat them. They are just examples, but learn how to prepare and eat new things especially vegetables. People ate better on the rationing system when they had vegetables available to them. Learn to eat more vegetables and figure out a way for your picky eaters to eat them too.

Rationing is never an easy thing, but you can learn to use it to your advantage. If you take steps now to learn these skills and start storing food, you will have an easier time living on a food rationing system.

Some other articles of interest would be:
Food Rationing, Food Storage, and Wartime: We Have Much To Learn
Ten Lessons Learned About Food From The Depression and Wartime

Thanks for reading,
Erica


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