Tuesday, August 22, 2017

The 10 Cold, Hard, Ugly Truths About Prepping


Many people have a dim view of prepping. They think preppers are crazy. They think prepping is easy. A lot of people think they just need a little extra food, an emergency kit, and a case of bottled water and they will be fine. 

Then disaster is about to strike. All of a sudden, they are panicking. They wipe out the grocery shelves and empty gas stations when they find out the power may be out for a week. They wish they would have done more prepping before, but it looked like too much work. 

Prepping is work. It can be enjoyable work, a lot of fun sometimes, and a great bonding experience. The hard work pays off when you are feeling secure with your preps and knowing you can easily ride out a week with no power or a month with no job. You don't need to make a last minute panic trip to the grocery store. You don't need to wait in long lines for FEMA supplies. You don't need to apply for government assistance. You and your loved ones will be fine.

Those other people? The ones who thought you were crazy? They need to realize they need to do the work too. Most people don't understand the cold, hard, ugly truths about prepping. They just see it as a crazy thing or easy to do right before a storm. Then they find out the reality of what you do. They go through the hardships and wonder why they didn't do more. 

All your hard work pays off. You are prepared although, in your mind, there will be more you thought you could have done. Every learning experience is a teaching moment and you will learn more as you prepare more. You will know next time what you need to do. You will know what you need to buy and what measures you need to take now for the next crisis. 

Because you already know the 10 Cold, Hard, Ugly Truths about Prepping

1. You never be prepared enough. In your mind, you will always think there is more to do and to be done. That is okay. That mindset will keep you from getting comfortable with your level of prepping. That attitude will drive you to prepare more and harder. 

2. You can try to be prepared for everything, but more than likely you won't be. It is really not possible to be prepared for everything. Personal crisises will likely catch you off-guard. Disasters are unpredictable and can strike with only a few days notice. Trying to be prepared for all of that is mentally exhausting and almost impossible to do. You are better off doing the best you can to be prepared and not to be caught unaware. You should cover your basics and expand from there. 

3. Prepping is hard. If prepping was easy, everyone would be doing it. However, everyone is not (unfortunately). Prepping takes forethought, good decision making, smart thinking, skill learning, money, and time. You will have to decide what to prep for and how much to prep. You will have to save money for the big purchases. Prepping is not easy. 

4. Prepping takes time. You cannot accrue all your food storage in one day. Skills take time to learn, practice, and perfect. You will have to save money to make the big purchases or buy a home in an area you want to relocate to. You will have to make plans and practice them. Most people have the time to prep, but don't want to take it.  

5. You will never really be done prepping. There is always more you can do. If you are prepped for a month, prep for three months. Then take the next step. There is always more skills you can learn and perfect. You can always add to the food storage. You can always revise your plans. You can always do more prepping. It is just a matter of do you want to do more prepping?

6. You shouldn't prep out of fear, but you will prep out of fear at some point. Fear is a powerful motivator and that is not a bad thing. Just as long as you do not get crazy and buy out your local store. Being a little fearful will keep your focus sharp, but can also cloud your judgment. Just be wary of being too fearful.

7. You will have friends and family who will think you are crazy for prepping. Let them think it. They are not responsible for your survival. You are. Just be ready with a plan when they come knocking on your door. Also, practice saying "no". Be an encourager, not an enabler.

8. You cannot prep in just one day. Prepping takes time, money, skills, and resources. These cannot be acquired in one day. You might be ready for something short term, but long term prepping takes time and effort. Make a plan for your prepping and make lists for what you need to do, need to buy, and need to learn. 

9. Someone will be better prepared than you. Instead of being jealous, try finding out what he is doing and prep harder. Admire what he has done and take notes. 

10. You cannot be an armchair prepper. You cannot just buy, buy, buy and expect to be prepared. You bought enough food to survive five years, but how will you cook it? You have seeds for that survival garden, but have you ever planted something? You bought a gun, but have you ever shot it? You need to get around quickly, but are you in shape? Being an armchair prepper is a dangerous thing and will be more a danger to those he is trying to protect.

Most of you reading this already know these truths and have experienced them. However, you also know what you need to do and who you need to convince of these truths. They will be the ones standing on your doorstep, crying through the door that they need you to help them, and will not be nice about it. 

You already know the truth and they should know too.

Thanks for reading,
Erica


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